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What Are The Pros & Cons Of Paying To Lock In Mortgage Rates?

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There are pros and cons to consider when it comes to locking in mortgage rates. On the one hand, paying to lock in a rate can provide peace of mind and protection from rising rates. On the other hand, there is always the potential that rates could fall after you’ve locked in, leaving you with a higher rate than you would have otherwise had. So, what’s the best approach? Let’s look at the pros and cons of paying to lock in mortgage rates.

Pros of Paying to Lock In Mortgage Rates:

Protection From Rising Rates –

Perhaps the most significant advantage of paying to lock in mortgage rates is that it protects you from rising rates. If rates rise after you’ve locked in, you’ll still be able to get your loan at the lower, locked-in rate. This means you won’t have to worry about your monthly mortgage payment increasing.

Peace Of Mind – 

Another advantage of locking in a rate is providing peace of mind. Knowing that your rate won’t go up for a certain period can be reassuring if interest rates are trending upwards. You will be able to budget for your mortgage payment each month without worrying about a rate increase.

Predictability –

Another advantage of paying to lock in mortgage rates is making budgeting and planning easier. If you know what your mortgage payment will be for the next year, it can be easier to plan your finances. This can be helpful if you’re trying to save up for a major purchase or life event. The mortgage rate lock provides predictability and stability in an otherwise uncertain world.

Better Terms & Rates –

Finally, paying to lock in a mortgage rate can get you better terms and rates in some cases. Lenders may be more willing to offer you a lower interest rate if you’re willing to lock it in for a certain period. This can save you money over the life of your loan.

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Cons of Paying to Lock In Mortgage Rates:

Potential For Missed Opportunities –

The main disadvantage of paying to lock in mortgage rates is that you may miss out on potential rate decreases. If interest rates fall after you’ve locked in your mortgage rate, you won’t be able to take advantage of the lower rates. This could cost you more in the long run if rates fall significantly.

Loss Of Flexibility –

Another disadvantage of locking in mortgage rates is limiting your flexibility. Once you lock in a rate, you’re committed to that rate for a set period. This means you won’t be able to take advantage of lower rates even if they’re available. This can be an issue if you need to refinance or sell your home before the lock period expires.

Paying Points –

Another potential downside of locking in mortgage rates is that you may have to pay points. Points are a fee charged by the lender in exchange for a lower interest rate. You may pay points upfront to get the lower rate if you lock in a rate. This can add significantly to your mortgage costs over the life of the loan.

Paying For Protection You Might Not Need –

One disadvantage of paying to lock in mortgage rates is that you might not need the protection. If interest rates are stable or trending downwards, you might not need to lock in your mortgage rate. Paying for a lock when you don’t need it can be a waste of money. You’ll need to weigh the potential benefits of locking in against the costs to decide if it’s right for you.

Risks Of Rate Drops –

The risks of rate-locks dropping are always there, and it is a genuine possibility in the current market. Historical data shows that mortgage rates will generally trend upwards over a long period. If you do not lock in a rate and rates drop after you’ve applied, you could be stuck with a higher interest rate than you would have otherwise had.

So, what is the best approach? The answer to this question depends on your situation. If you’re worried about rising interest rates, paying to lock in a rate can be a good idea. However, if rates are stable or trending downwards, you might not need to lock in your mortgage rate. Ultimately, you will need to weigh the pros and cons of paying to lock in mortgage rates and decide what is best for you. We provide free Housing Counseling services that could also help you answer this question and many more!

Author: Lauralynn Mangis
Lauralynn is the Online Marketing Specialist for Advantage CCS. She is married and has two young daughters. She enjoys writing, reading, hiking, cooking, video games, sewing, and gardening. Lauralynn has a degree in Multimedia Technologies from Pittsburgh Technical College.